FLYING PINHOLE CAMERA INSTRUCTIONS

 

Click here to see Instructions with pretty picures

PREPARATION:

Thanks BOB from Galaxy Camera. It made me cry, but I took the lens out of this neat voigtlander that BOB from Galaxy Camera had donated for our project. I got over it... down with lenses... long live the pinhole.

THE EQUIPMENT:

In your package you received a pinhole camera and a light meter. I never use a light meter but it really is the way to go and this is a neat old one.

THE CAMERA:

As I mentioned the camera was donated be bob but the idea came from guy. If you have questions about the constructions, guy has a great website depicting how to build it.

THE LIGHT METER: 1

An oldy but a goody. When the camera is set up to take the shot, stand in front of the camera (in the shot) point the light meter towards the camera, and take a reading of the light.

THE LIGHT METER: 2

Slide the cover so that the light meter is open and not closed.

THE LIGHT METER: 3

Read the number that the needle indicates (see B on photo). Turn the dial so that the number is the same (see A on photo)

THE LIGHT METER: 4

The dial is set for 100 asa. You only have to turn it to change the number to match the needle (make A match B).

THE EXPOSURE:

Here is the important part. The top row of numbers is the exposure time (the sideways 500 on the left means 1/500 of a second and the up and down 8 on the right means 8 seconds) From the center row of numbers (the same row that A is on from photo) look up number 32 and read the exposure time that matches from the top row. Now for the math. Multiply that number by 10 and that gives you the number of seconds to open your shutter. Or.. just guess (25 seconds on cloudy day and 5 seconds on a bright sunny day... might work)

THE SHUTTER:

Like the pinhole camera you will build, this camera is designed with an elaborate shutter (little black piece of tape). You will take only one picture with this camera. When you are ready , pull the tab down all the way to open the shutter and pull it back up to close. Important: DO NOT HOLD THE CAMERA IN YOUR HANDS TO TAKE THE SHOT. Set it on something solid that will not move.

THE WINDER:

After you have completed your shot you have to wind the film. Turn the winder 3 half turns (1 1/2 turns in all). This will expose 12 shots on the film and blend all our photos nicely. Since there are 12 of us it works out perfectly. Don't forget this step or the next image will be overlapped on yours.